Tag Archives: greenhouse gases

Enviro Blog Post 2: Weather Gone Wild: Mauritian edition

24 Apr

Among the material and concepts we went over when we were going over Module 2 in class, we went over humanity’s carbon footprint and we watched documentaries such as “Weather Gone Wild” and “Do the Math”. The films explored issues like recent extreme weather conditions, expectations of future natural disasters, requirements for the survival of our society, the carbon cycle and the huge negative impact of fossil fuel companies on the planet’s equilibrium. As much as they tried to be global, the documentaries’ main focus was on North America but I could not help but apply all this information to my country, Mauritius.

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Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. With 2040 km² area of land and a population of approximately 1.3 million, Mauritius is my home. Many may not know about my country but we rank 1st in Africa for Economic Freedom, Global Economic Competitiveness, Global Innovation, Peace, Democracy, ICT Development, Environmental Performance and Social Progress among others. Mauritius is one of the most successful stories among the developing countries, yet I am worried about its future. Despite our general success, we have been classified as ‘Highly Vulnerable’ by the South Pacific Applied Geoscience Commission and the United Nations Environment Program. The latter program has added that the island is vulnerable to “considerable economic loss, humanitarian stresses and environmental degradation as a result of climate change impacts.”

There is no denying that Mauritius has recently been experiencing extreme weather. The events of March 30, 2013 got us featured on international news: in less than 2 hours, over 150mm of rain fell on the capital, that is more than half of the average expected rainfall for the whole month of March. These torrential rains caused flash floods that killed 11 people, injured around a hundred and caused thousands of dollars of damage.

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Who was to blame for this disaster? The Ministry of Public Infrastructure for the poorly designed drains and roads? The Meteorological station for failing to predict the intensity and destructiveness of the rain? The population for the insane littering that blocked the drains? The Government for failing to create a recycling campaign to prevent the littering in the first place? None of them are responsible for the weather itself, that would be the effect of climate change on the weather patterns of the island. However, the disaster is not the flood. The real disaster is the deaths and all the damage that could- and should- have been avoided. This is the real cost of climate change and the Government as well as the people are equally responsible and simultaneously, the ones coping with most of the cost. It would be logical to assume that after two years of ‘March Torrential Rain Madness’ the population and the authorities would be better prepared, yet it happened again this year, once again exposing the limitations of the infrastructure and of the Disaster Management Committee. Once again, thousands of dollars worth of damage was caused.

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The United Nations Development Program has predicted that the direct climate change impacts likely to adversely affect Mauritius include an increase in the frequency of intense rainfall episodes, sea level rise of 18 to 59 centimeters by 2100 and an increase in intensity of tropical cyclones. Mauritius knows how to deal with cyclones, it is one of the best-prepared countries in the world when it comes to cyclones but the same cannot be said when it comes to floods and landslides, our recent threats. No, we cannot stop the rain from falling but we can change how we deal with the rain just like we learnt how to deal with cyclones before. Adaptation is the key issue we share with the rest of the world. It is the only way to protect the Mauritian people and property from the devastating effect of climate change. Most of our population are still ignorant about the phenomenon of climate change and its related impacts and issues. An ignorant population makes us more vulnerable to climate change and ignorant stubborn leaders who refuse to face the inevitable makes us the most vulnerable. Climate change is an issue of national security, people’s lives are at stake, it is time for real actions to be taken. The waning sewage, drain, land transport and electrical systems are becoming obsolete and have to be upgraded- and not simply repaired- to ensure a safer future for Mauritians. Mauritians, themselves, have to become more self-aware of the consequences of their actions, such as littering.

dirty mauritius

I’ve had enough of seeing this after every big flood.

Adaptation is not the only key to rising up to the challenge of climate change for Mauritius. As a developing country, we barely have a say in international climate change debates and we are not big contributors to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, however that does not exempt us from advancing in the direction of mitigation. In Mauritius, thermal plants fueled by diesel oil are responsible for more than 80% of electrical power generation, while hydroelectric power and bagasse generates the remaining 20%. However, in a developing country, the demand for energy keeps increasing and in the recent years some private investors have designed and have been trying to implement the CT Power project- a coal based energy generating system. It is a well known scientific fact that coal is the dirtiest fossil fuel, yet the promoters of this project assured Mauritians that coal could be as clean as it is cheap and that there was no real threat to the environment. The ignorant, greedy and debt-ridden Government of the country had no choice but to give the project the green light. Fortunately, the population’s indignation and a change in Government this year, spelt the end of CT power and I could not be prouder. This is a huge step in mitigation for Mauritius. It harmonizes perfectly with the construction and design of all new buildings to be self-providing in electricity through solar panels. Yet, despite our efforts, Mauritius will suffer more from climate change than bigger countries simply because we are a developing country and an island nation.

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Yes it’s unfair and that is why the people of Mauritius, my people, have to strive exceptionally hard in respect to mitigation and adaptation so that we can become resilient to most of the impacts of climate change. We are a small nation, it is easier to take decisions and to work for the good of the whole population and sustain everyone; we could be an example of resilience. To achieve this we have to make changes now, before climate change catches up on us entirely and brings about the end of our paradise.

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